Major prose works:

1.       A Tale of a Tub

2.      Battle of the Books (1697, published 1704)

3.      The Drapier's Letters (1724)

4.      "Verses on the Death of Dr. Swift" (1739)

5.      Gulliver's Travels

6.      A Modest Proposal for Preventing the Children of Poor People in Ireland Being a Burden on Their Parents or Country, and for Making Them Beneficial to the Publick

 

*    Essays, tracts, pamphlets, periodicals:

  1. "A Meditation upon a Broom-stick" (1703–1710): Full text: Project Gutenberg
  2. "A Tritical Essay upon the Faculties of the Mind" (1707–1711): Full text: Jonathan Swift Archives, King's College London
  3. The Bickerstaff-Partridge Papers (1708–1709): Full text: U of Adelaide
  4. "An Argument Against Abolishing Christianity" (1708–1711): Full text: U of Adelaide
  5. The Intelligencer (with Thomas Sheridan) (1719–1788): Text: Project Gutenberg
  6. The Examiner (1710): Texts: Ourcivilisation.comProject Gutenberg
  7. "A Proposal for Correcting, Improving and Ascertaining the English Tongue" (1712): Full texts: Jack LynchU of Virginia
  8. "On the Conduct of the Allies" (1711)
  9. "Hints Toward an Essay on Conversation" (1713): Full text: Bartleby.com
  10. "A Letter to a Young Gentleman, Lately Entered into Holy Orders" (1720)
  11. "A Letter of Advice to a Young Poet" (1721): Full text: Bartleby.com
  12. Drapier's Letters (1724, 1725): Full text: Project Gutenberg
  13. "Bon Mots de Stella" (1726): a curiously irrelevant appendix to "Gulliver's Travels"
  14. "A Modest Proposal", perhaps the most notable satire in English, suggesting that the Irish should engage in cannibalism. (Written in 1729)
  15. "An Essay on the Fates of Clergymen"
  16. "A Treatise on Good Manners and Good Breeding": Full text: Bartleby.com
  17. "A modest address to the wicked authors of the present age. Particularly the authors of Christianity not founded on argument; and of The resurrection of Jesus considered" (1743–5?)

*    Poems:

  1. "Ode to the Athenian Society", Swift's first publication, printed in The Athenian Mercury in the supplement of Feb 14, 1691.
  2. Poems of Jonathan Swift, D.D. Texts at Project Gutenberg: Volume OneVolume Two
  3. "Baucis and Philemon" (1706–1709): Full text: Munseys
  4. "A Description of the Morning" (1709): Full annotated text: U of Toronto; Another text: U of Virginia
  5. "A Description of a City Shower" (1710): Full text: U of Virginia
  6. "Cadenus and Vanessa" (1713): Full text: Munseys
  7. "Phillis, or, the Progress of Love" (1719): Full text: theotherpages.org
  8. Stella's birthday poems:
    1. 1719. Full annotated text: U of Toronto
    2. 1720. Full text: U of Virginia
    3. 1727. Full text: U of Toronto
  9. "The Progress of Beauty" (1719–1720): Full text: OurCivilisation.com
  10. "The Progress of Poetry" (1720): Full text: theotherpages.org
  11. "A Satirical Elegy on the Death of a Late Famous General" (1722): Full text: U of Toronto
  12. "To Quilca, a Country House not in Good Repair" (1725): Full text: U of Toronto
  13. "Advice to the Grub Street Verse-writers" (1726): Full text: U of Toronto
  14. "The Furniture of a Woman's Mind" (1727)
  15. "On a Very Old Glass" (1728): Full text: Gosford.co.uk
  16. "A Pastoral Dialogue" (1729): Full text: Gosford.co.uk
  17. "The Grand Question debated Whether Hamilton's Bawn should be turned into a Barrack or a Malt House" (1729): Full text: Gosford.co.uk
  18. "On Stephen Duck, the Thresher and Favourite Poet" (1730): Full text: U of Toronto
  19. "Death and Daphne" (1730): Full text: OurCivilisation.com
  20. "The Place of the Damn'd" (1731): Full text at the Wayback Machine (archived 27 October 2009)
  21. "A Beautiful Young Nymph Going to Bed" (1731): Full annotated text: Jack Lynch; Another text: U of Virginia
  22. "Strephon and Chloe" (1731): Full annotated text: Jack Lynch; Another text: U of Virginia
  23. "Helter Skelter" (1731): Full text: OurCivilisation.com
  24. "Cassinus and Peter: A Tragical Elegy" (1731): Full annotated text: Jack Lynch
  25. "The Day of Judgment" (1731): Full text
  26. "Verses on the Death of Dr. Swift, D.S.P.D." (1731–1732): Full annotated texts: Jack LynchU of Toronto; Non-annotated text:: U of Virginia
  27. "An Epistle to a Lady" (1732): Full text: OurCivilisation.com
  28. "The Beasts' Confession to the Priest" (1732): Full annotated text: U of Toronto
  29. "The Lady's Dressing Room" (1732): Full annotated text: Jack Lynch
  30. "On Poetry: A Rhapsody" (1733)
  31. "The Puppet Show" Full text: Worldwideschool.org
  32. "The Logicians Refuted" Full text: Worldwideschool.org

*    Correspondence, personal writings

  1. "When I Come to Be Old" – Swift's resolutions. (1699): Full text: JaffeBros
  2. A Journal to Stella (1710–1713): Full text (presented as daily entries): The Journal to Stella; Extracts: OurCivilisation.com;
  3. Letters:
    1. Selected Letters: JaffeBros
    2. To Oxford and Pope: OurCivilisation.com
  4. The Correspondence of Jonathan Swift, D.D. Edited by David Woolley. In four volumes, plus index volume. Frankfurt am Main; New York : P. Lang, c. 1999–c. 2007.

*    Sermons, prayers

  1. Three Sermons and Three Prayers. Full text: U of AdelaideProject Gutenberg
  2. Three Sermons: I. on mutual subjection. II. on conscience. III. on the trinity. Text: Project Gutenberg
  3. Writings on Religion and the Church. Text at Project Gutenberg: Volume OneVolume Two
  4. "The First He Wrote Oct. 17, 1727." Full text: Worldwideschool.org
  5. "The Second Prayer Was Written Nov. 6, 1727." Full text: Worldwideschool.org

*      Miscellany:

  1. Directions to Servants (1731): Full text: Jonathon Swift Archive
  2. A Complete Collection of Genteel and Ingenious Conversation (1738)
  3. "Thoughts on Various Subjects." Full text: U of Adelaide
  4. Historical Writings: Project Gutenberg
  5. Swift quotes at Bartleby: Bartleby.com – 59 quotations, with notes

 

Author: Datta G Sawant